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ARL Response to White House RFI on Public Access to Scholarly Publications

(arl.org): Enhancing public access to federally funded research results is a priority for ARL and its member libraries because such policies are integrally tied to and support the mission of higher education and scholarship. ARL believes that extending and enhancing public access policies to federally funded research to other science and technology agencies will drive scientific discovery and innovation, and promote economic growth. Extending enhanced public access policies to other federal agencies is long overdue.
   
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Digital content demand rising as more Americans use mobile devices

(brafton.com): Content marketing plans should move full steam ahead as a report from Deloitte highlighted the growth of digital content consumption in the United States, with an increasing amount of Americans accessing content from multiple devices. Thirty-three percent of Americans would rather access books, magazines and news content on their laptops, smartphones and tablets than traditional hard copies. This represents a substantial increase in digital content consumption over the past few years; in 2007, 23 percent of respondents expressed such a preference.
   
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Benefits of paper still outweigh e-books

(dailybruin.com): A 2010 OnCampus Research Electronic Book and E-Reader Device survey found that 74 percent of students still prefer printed books over their digital counterparts, and only 13 percent of the students surveyed bought an e-book of any kind within the past three months. E-books really should be a no-brainer.
   
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The Revolution Isn't Just Digital

(americanlibrariesmagazine.org): The digital revolution in libraries is not exactly a secret. Every day we read about some upheaval in the ebook industry - a new development in digitization or yet another service from Google. And the recent announcement of an ALA-wide initiative on digital content and libraries, while important and necessary, won't exactly make media headlines.
   
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Could an iTunes-like model work with scientific publishing?

(scienceblogs.com): Many of you may remember a time when music-stealing was rampant on the internet. Apple changed this situation by establishing a new kind of marketplace. Now people pay for music and download it from iTunes. What if there was a third party group, with an iTunes-like model, where scientific publishers would make papers available for purchase? Could this kind of model work?
   
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