About us | About Scoope | Contact us
Scopelogo
 
google

 
  
 Sponsor Links
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
resources
White Papers STM PUBLISHING INDUSTRY RESOURCES
| Articles | White Papers | Presentations 
 


Articles                                                                                                  TOP

Internet Ruffles Pricey Scholarly Journals

(nytimes.com): After decades of healthy profits, the scholarly publishing industry now finds itself in the throes of a revolt led by the most unlikely campus revolutionaries: the librarians. Universities from Britain to California are refusing to renew their expensive subscriptions, turning instead to "open access" publishing, an arrangement whereby material is made available free on the Internet with few or no restrictions except for the obligation to cite it.
   
Click here

Survey shows e-readers promoting increased reading in the US

(afterdawn.com): The results of a study by Harris Interactive seem to indicate the adoption of e-book readers is leading to people in the US buying and reading more books. The numbers include both dedicated e-readers, like the Kindle, and tablet computers with e-reader apps.
   
Click here

Smartphone, tablet users prefer researching to purchasing: report

(ecommerce.cbronline.com): New trends in m-Commerce show that smartphone owners are impulsive. Nearly double of smartphone and tablet owners use their gadgets to research a product rather than buying it, market research company e-Marketer has said.
   
Click here

Medical journal condemns prolonged refugee detention

(theconversation.edu.au): New trends in m-Commerce show that smartphone owners are impulsive. Nearly double of smartphone and tablet owners use their gadgets to research a product rather than buying it, market research company e-Marketer has said.
   
Click here

Brazilian Science Grows in Quantity not in Quality

(onislam.net): Brazil's booming economy is doing well, and so it might seem is its scientific output. Over the last three decades, the country's scientific performance seems to have improved considerably. The numbers speak for themselves: researchers have increased their academic production from a mere 2,000 papers in 1980 to more than 35,000 in 2009. Sounds exciting? While some cheer these growing numbers, others see downsides in what they hide.
   
Click here

For banner ads click here