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The Evolution of the MLA International Bibliography

The MLA International Bibliography covers literature, language and linguistics, folklore, film, literary theory and criticism, dramatic arts, as well as the historical aspects of printing and publishing. Listings on rhetoric and composition and the history, theory and practice of teaching language and literature are also included. Citations in the MLA International Bibliography represent scholarly materials published in more than 70 languages and originating in over 100 countries. The MLA's multilingual subject specialists index more than 75,000 new documents each year; 40 percent are in languages other than English. The search interface is available in 30 languages.
   
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South Africa: How to Fix the Academic Peer Review System

Peer review has long been a holy cow in the academic publication process. The idea of peer review is to hold academics' feet to the proverbial fire, ensuring that we publish only work of reasonable quality. But in fact, what the global academy has been clinging to for more than a century is largely anonymous, off-the-record, pre-publication peer review. Every academic knows the frustration of trying to satisfy or rebut reviewers who contradict each other or who demand revisions that miss the point and dilute the results. The original intention and lifeblood of peer review - opening the doors of scholarly journals beyond the old boys' clubs - has been squeezed out by the forces of over-commitment, financial gain, careerism and raw jealousy.
   
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Bogus academic journals undermine science in SA

Predatory publishing, in which bogus journals publish academic research for a fee, threatens to undermine science in SA. This is the warning from academics at Stellenbosch University‚ who say Blade Nzimande's Department of Higher Education and Training has wasted up to R300m on research grants to scientists whose work ended up in sham journals. Between 2005 and 2014, more than a quarter of the research output at three universities ended up in bogus journals. They are Mangosuthu University of Technology in Durban; the University of Fort Hare in Alice; and Walter Sisulu University in Mthatha.
   
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Biblio-Talk: Open access journals important issue in Queens County libraries

Open access journals come in a variety of forms and styles but at their core they are journals or articles that are free and open to anyone. These can be set up by institutions through digital or print collections or on free, open-sourced online sites. This movement is incredibly important in Canada as most journal subscriptions are priced in American dollars. So as the loonie slides, universities need to make tough choices on what they can afford. Memorial University in Newfoundland was faced with this problem in December 2015 and sadly had to stop their subscription to over 7,000 journals to stay within budget. This is not an issue that can be fixed tomorrow, but it is important to think and talk about the way in which research is done in the current world and how beneficial a move to open access can be.
   
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No publication without confirmation

Concern over the reliability of published biomedical results grows unabated. Frustration with this 'reproducibility crisis' is felt by everyone pursuing new disease treatments: from clinicians and would-be drug developers who want solid foundations for the preclinical research they build on, to basic scientists who are forced to devote more time and resources to newly imposed requirements for rigour, reporting and statistics. Tightening rigour across all experiments will decrease the number of false positive findings, but comes with the risk of reducing experimental efficiency and creativity. Bolder ideas are needed. What is being proposed here is a compromise between the need to trust conclusions in published papers and the freedom for basic scientists to explore and innovate.
   
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